Making a Model Cell Cake – Part 3

Back in 2011 (when the kids were 9, 8, and 4 years old) we first studied the structure of cells in biology and the kids first tried their hands at making various cell models, including a cake version of a plant cell. It was a big hit! The kids had a blast both making the project and eating it. Then in 2013, the boys’ science curriculum covered cells again and Katie joined them in the fun of making another cell cake, though the second time around it was a model of an animal cell.

Well, this time Katie’s science curriculum is tackling the subject of cells as the building block of life and guess what? Yep, since it has been five years since she tagged along on the boys’ science project and she didn’t remember much about the experience, she wanted to make the cell cake again, this time totally on her own and with no help from me. So, after strolling through the Japanese grocery store in our neighborhood to look for candy and cookies that resembled organelles, Katie got out the recipe for an easy yellow cake and built her model from the ground up. This time she went a step further from our past models and made labels for the cake as well. I think it turned out great and the taste was to die for! Here are a few photos of her project:

Exploring the Microscopic World

Bug parts, cheek cells, fabrics, leaves, hairs, paper scraps, drops of slimy pond water.  These are just some of the ordinary-turned fascinating items that we have examined under the lens of our microscope so far this school year as part of our Sonlight science curriculum.  It’s amazing how getting a chance to look closely at items we normally take for granted can elicit ooohs and aaahs from kids and parents alike!

We also recently did a project where we made gelatin, added it to petri dishes, and then stuck our fingers in potentially germ-infested substances.  We then poked our fingers into the gelatin to see what kinds of creepy microscopic organisms would grow!  Gross stuff like ear wax, nose mucous, river water, dust behind the refrigerator, and more made it into our petri dishes.  We also pushed a clean finger into one petri dish and in another a finger disinfected with Germ-X alcohol gel so we could compare the dishes that had been touched with something clean with the dishes that had been touched with something dirty.  A week or so later,  we got to look at all the dishes under our microscope.  Wow!  Exciting stuff!

Since we’ve been reading about the structure of cells in our Usborne World of the Microscope book, we decided to make models of animals cells out of cake.  A couple of years ago we did the same project with plant cells, but it was so much fun (and so delicious!) that we decided it was worth doing again.  This time Katie was old enough to join in the fun and make her very own cell model all by herself.

Science is one of our most hands-on topics and it gives a chance to marvel at God’s creativity, intelligence, and attention to detail so it is definitely a favorite around here!